Philosophy Weekend: Disturbances in the Field

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I’m still taking a break from the lengthy weekend posts. What I’ve got for you today is three enigmatic quotes.

”An ant can look up at you, too, and even threaten you with its arms. Of course, my dog does not know I am human, he sees me as dog, though I do not leap up at a fence. I am a strong dog. But I do not leave my mouth hanging open when I walk along. Even on a hot day, I do not leave my tongue hanging out. But I bark at him: "No! No!”” — Lydis Davis, Varieties of Disturbance

”[… Carl Jung, while studying] disturbances that afflict children at points in their development, he saw many, if not most, of these disturbances as due more to the child’s absorption of conflicts from the parents’ repressed or denied unconscious material rather than to any disturbance inherent in the child. Jung therefore found it more helpful to have the parents of a disturbed child in analysis rather than to treat the child alone, and his case reports of work with children reflect his opinion that the causes of a child’s disturbances are to be found in the unconscious of the adults around the child.

"In the childhood state of unconsciousness, which Jung considered normal, Jung saw an image of the collective or racial unconscious. His theory that the individual human being recapitulates in his or her individual psychological development the stages that the species has gone through in its psychological development as a whole is thus applied to children whose unconscious state permits them access to the collective unconscious of all humanity in a way that adults subsequently lose through the development of ego.” — Robert Hopcke, A Guided Tour of the Collected Works of C. G. Jung

“I regard myself as the victim of a disturbance in nature.” — Friedrich Nietzsche, private letter to a friend

(photo source)

This article is part of the series Philosophy Weekend. The next post in the series is Philosophy Weekend: Is Religious War a Fraud?. The previous post in the series is Philosophy Weekend: Thinking Like Wittgenstein.
1 Response to "Philosophy Weekend: Disturbances in the Field"

by Steve Plonk on

Consider Jung's theory of Synchronicity...yes, there are anomalies in this
world & the next. There are remnants of past existence which may be
viewed by long distance. We learn by fits & starts. We exist in many
planes at once & the internet is another plane of existence which
may even transcend our human abilities to regulate it. The NET is future
in the making of it. Our keyboards are traveling outside of time & space...
I ponder these disturbing thoughts constantly. I am periodically rewarded
by wild gifts.

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